Touring Japanese - Snacking With Coxie - Ride UK BMX

The latest BMX news, interviews, blogs and BMX how to guides. Ride UK also has the best BMX videos on the net.

Share

News

Touring Japanese – Snacking With Coxie

No BMX trip is complete without having to stop and eat at least once every hour. James Cox has snacked in some of the biggest countries on Earth. Today we’re Touring Japanese with the United crew, so we figured James is the key man to fill us in on the snack culture of East Asia.


When not filming the crew, James is often seen sampling the local cuisine and embracing the culture. Here a quick refreshment stop turns in to a festival of Anglo – Japanese relations. Needless to say we’re on good terms.

 
A Big Mac contains 540 calories and 29g of fat. Traditional Japanese noodles contain 188 calories and 7g of fat. James would usually choose the Big Mac option. While out in Japan he consumed enough noodles in one sitting, it eclipsed the Big Mac calorie intake leaving him full, but not uncomfortably full. This is important when carrying around camera equipment for up to 12 hours per day.

 
James explains to the guys about his strategy for more calories with a less bloated outcome. Walter seems interested for a moment, before going back to his traditional American meal, while using the proven fork utensil system.

 
Probiotics are a modern twist on keeping your insides healthy. Here we see a chap gulp down the elixir with clearly positive results. Healthy, happy and ready for the day.

 
Traditionalists however, may argue the secret to healthy digestion is insects in a bag. Above is what was once a gang of earwigs, processed, packaged and sold in a Japanese market. To the delight of local school children and Western BMXers.

James loves to eat pizza and sausages. His favourite appliance is a microwave. Upon landing in Japan he couldn’t contain his excitement when discovering the Japanese people were on the same page as him, snack wise! Above is a Pizza Wiener, for microwave use only.

It’s good to drink plenty of water. The Japanese make it easy to distinguish between drinkable and non drinkable fountains.

 

Share

Newsletter Terms & Conditions

Please enter your email so we can keep you updated with news, features and the latest offers. If you are not interested you can unsubscribe at any time. We will never sell your data and you'll only get messages from us and our partners whose products and services we think you'll enjoy.

Read our full Privacy Policy as well as Terms & Conditions.

production